Toledo Theft Crimes Lawyer

Theft offenses are considered serious crimes in Ohio. You may face jail time, probation, fines, and possible civil penalties. A conviction can also have negative consequences for your employment prospects, educational opportunities, and even immigration status.

If you or a loved one has been charged with theft, you need to consult with an experienced Toledo theft crimes lawyer in order to avoid serious penalties and punishments. Patituce & Associates, LLC can provide you with the highest quality legal defense.

Our team includes former prosecutors, and we know how the state will build its case and what evidence it will prioritize. Our Toledo criminal defense attorneys know the weakness of almost every case and how prosecutors think. That’s why we are never afraid to step into the courtroom in order to defend our clients.

Our lawyers know how the jury tends to evaluate evidence and arrive at their decisions. We will help you mount a credible defense a jury can understand. Our team is prepared to protect your rights and fight for the best outcome possible.

Call Patituce & Associates at 419-737-4556 today for a free consultation about your theft offense case in Toledo, OH.

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What Is Considered Theft Under Ohio Law?

Like many other states, Ohio classifies theft-related offenses according to the value of the property as well as the type of property. Ohio’s theft law prohibits someone from knowingly exerting control or obtaining someone else’s property or services:

  • By deception, intimidation, or threat;
  • Without the consent of the owner of the property or the person who is authorized to give consent;
  • Beyond the scope of the implied consent of the owner or the person who is authorized to give consent.

What Are the Classifications of Theft in Ohio?

The level of a theft offense and the type of theft charge in Ohio depends on many factors including:

  • Whether a firearm was used in the process;
  • The value of the stolen property;
  • Whether the victim belongs to a protected group.

A theft offense in Ohio can fall under misdemeanor or felony charges.

Petty Theft

When the value of the stolen property is less than $1,000, petty theft occurs. It’s considered a first-degree misdemeanor charge and is the least serious type of theft.

Felony Theft

A theft is a felony when the value of the stolen property is more than $1,000.

  • When the value of the stolen property is between $1,000 and $7,500, it’s considered a 5th-degree felony.
  • When the value of the stolen property is between $7,500 and $150,000, it’s considered a 4th-degree felony.
  • When the value of the stolen property is between $150,000 and $750,000, it’s considered a 3rd-degree felony.
  • When the value of the stolen property is between $750,000 and $1,500,000, it’s considered a 2nd-degree felony.
  • When the value of the stolen property is $1,500,000 or more, it’s considered a 1st-degree felony.

Grand Theft

In the state of Ohio, when the value of the property/service stolen is between $7,500 – $150,000, it’s considered a grand theft. In fact, grand theft is a felony of the fourth degree that’s punishable by 6 to 18 months in prison and up to $5,000 in fines.

Aggravated Theft

Aggravated theft is a felony of the 3rd, 2nd, or 1st degree. It occurs when the value of the stolen property or service is between $150,000 – $750,000, or the property is a firearm or anhydrous ammonia. The punishment for such a crime could be one to five years in prison and up to $10,000 in fines.

On the other hand, an aggravated theft of the second degree occurs when the value of the stolen property or service is between $750,000 – $1,500,000. Such an offense is punishable with a prison term ranging from 2 to 8 years and no more than $15,000 in fines.

A felony of first degree occurs when the value of the stolen property or service exceeds $1,500,000. Such a crime is punishable by 3 to 11 years in prison and a fine of up to $20,000.

Toledo theft crimes lawyer concept image, a woman shoplifting clothes

What Are the Penalties for Shoplifting in Ohio?

In Ohio, shoplifting is categorized as a first-degree misdemeanor. The potential punishment may include a jail term of up to 6 months, a fine of up to $1,000, and probation for up to 5 years. If the value of the stolen item is over $1,000, the theft charge will be a felony and the potential punishment will be more severe as a result.

In addition to the punishment for being convicted of theft, the affected store may also collect money from you in the form of a “civil recovery” depending on the value of the merchandise stolen from the store or shop.

The most important thing to remember is, a theft conviction usually becomes a public record and may carry a stigma of dishonesty. That’s why you need to consult with an experienced lawyer when you have been charged with shoplifting or similar theft crimes.

The experienced Toledo theft crimes lawyers at Patituce & Associates, LLC are here to protect your legal rights and mount a credible defense on your behalf.

What Is the Difference Between Misdemeanor & Felony Theft in Ohio?

The main difference between a misdemeanor and felony theft in Ohio is the value of the property/services you allegedly stole. If the value of the stolen property or service is less than $1,000, you will most likely be charged with petty theft, which is a first-degree misdemeanor.

But there are exceptions to this rule. For example, if the stolen property was firearms/drugs, or if the owner of the stolen property is an elderly, disabled, or service member, you may be charged with a higher degree of theft.

If you are convicted of a first-degree misdemeanor, you could face up to 180 days in jail and have to pay up to $1,000 in fines. This doesn’t cover your lawyer fees and court charges.

When the value of the stolen property is more than $1,000, the theft will automatically fall under felony charges as per Ohio law.

Whether you are charged with a felony or misdemeanor, it’s best to work with an experienced theft lawyer from Patituce & Associates, LLC. That way, you are more likely to avoid jail time & keep a conviction off your record.

Ohio Burglary Laws

Burglary is when a person forces, lies, or sneaks their way into any potentially occupied building (or section of a building) with the intent to commit a crime. You can be charged with burglary even if you didn’t steal something.

The severity of a burglary charge depends on three factors:

  • If someone is in the building when it’s broken or snuck into;
  • If the building is someone’s home (either permanent or temporary);
  • If the prosecutor can prove the defendant intended to commit a crime.

If someone is accused of breaking into someone’s home while an occupant is “likely to be present,” they’ll be charged with a fourth-degree felony, but only if prosecutors can’t prove the defendant was going to commit a crime.

However, if someone is accused of breaking into an unoccupied building with the intent to commit a crime, they’ll be charged with a third-degree felony. But if someone is accused of breaking into a home or an occupied building and the prosecution can convince a jury they intended to commit a crime, then they’ll be charged with a second-degree felony.

Image of burglary, concept of Toledo theft crime defense lawyer

A burglary conviction can result in the following penalties.

  • 4th-degree: 6–18 months of prison and a $5,000 fine.
  • 3rd-degree: 9–36 months of prison and a $10,000 fine.
  • 2nd-degree: 2–8 years of prison and a $15,000 fine.
  • 2nd-degree with prior convictions: 12–18 years of prison and a $15,000 fine.

Ohio Robbery Laws

Robbery is defined in §2911.02 of the Ohio Revised Code as any attempted theft where the defendant has a deadly weapon, attempts to inflict physical harm, or threatens to use force on the alleged victim.

An unarmed defendant threatening force during an attempted theft will be charged with a third-degree felony. An armed defendant or an unarmed defendant who allegedly inflicts harm on someone during a theft attempt will be charged with a second-degree felony.

A robbery conviction can result in the following penalties.

  • 3rd-degree: 9–36 months in prison and a $10,000 fine.
  • 2nd-degree: 2–8 years in prison and a $15,000 fine.
  • 2nd-degree with prior convictions: 12–18 years in prison and a $15,000 fine.

Why Should I Hire Patituce & Associates, LLC?

At Patituce & Associates, our criminal defense lawyers have handled criminal matters through all stages of the justice process. Our team of expert Toledo theft crimes lawyers has a reputation for getting results. In fact, our team is ready to stand by you at every step in your case.

Our team has over 70 years of combined legal experience. They are backed by a track record of results. Our experts have handled hundreds of criminal cases, including shoplifting, robbery, burglary, juvenile cases, white-collar theft like fraud, and more.

Call Our Toledo Theft Crimes Lawyers Today!

Theft offenses are considered serious crimes in Ohio. You may face jail or prison time, probation, fines, and possible civil penalties. Such cases can also have severe repercussions on your educational opportunities, employment prospects, and even your immigration status.

That’s why you need to work with experienced Toledo defense lawyers like our team at Patituce & Associates when you or someone in your family is charged with a theft crime. Contact us at 419-737-4556 today for a free consultation.

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